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  • Detroit Tigers Dave Rozema and Ike Blessitt to honor Mark “The Bird” Fidrych

    Coming up on August 16, former Detroit Tigers greats Dave Rozema and Ike Blessitt will team up with the Navin Field Grounds Crew and Metro Times‘ own Dave Mesrey to honor legend Mark “The Bird” Fidrych. The festivities, known as the annual “Bird Bash,” will be held at the infamous Nemo’s Bar & Grill, and will benefit The Bird’s favorite charity, the Wertz Warriors, and also the Mark Fidrych Foundation. For more information, check out their website or Facebook page.

    The post Detroit Tigers Dave Rozema and Ike Blessitt to honor Mark “The Bird” Fidrych appeared first on Metro Times Blogs.

  • First Little League game at Navin Field today

    Today Navin Field (the Old Tiger Stadium) hosts its first Little League game on a new field made just to host the youngsters! Here’s a photo of the game happening right now, courtesy Tom Derry and Metro Times‘ copy editor extraordinaire, Dave Mesrey: Stop by the site (corner of Michigan and Trumbull) today to watch history in the making!

    The post First Little League game at Navin Field today appeared first on Metro Times Blogs.

  • Twerk du Soleil shakes up Detroit

    Former American Idol contestant Vonzell Solomon weighs in on twerking, natural hair & CEO status. In 2005, recording artist Vonzell “Baby V” Solomon embarked on a journey that changed her life. At the age of 20, Vonzell made it to the top three on American Idol before she was eliminated. But that was not the beginning nor the end of her journey to stardom. Vonzell is one of more than two dozen artists on tour with YouTube sensation Todrick Hall, who is a former Idol contestant as well. Todrick gained notoriety for his fast food drive-thru songs and also for producing parody videos  —  based on popular Broadway musicals and songs. His tour, uniquely entitled Twerk Du Soleil (translation: twerk of the sun), is a combination of his popular YouTube spoofs. Both Vonzell and her ratchet alter ego,Boonquisha Jenkins, made an appearance in Twerk Du Soleil,which stopped in Detroit July 23 at Saint Andrews Hall. Boonquisha opened the show by facilitating a twerking competition among the audience. Next, Vonzell made a reappearance singing a fan favorite – Whitney Houston’s “I Have Nothing.” Later, Boonquisha came on stage screaming “It’s so cold in the D! You gotta be from the D to […]

    The post Twerk du Soleil shakes up Detroit appeared first on Metro Times Blogs.

  • Poll shows Bob Ficano behind in Wayne County Executive race

    If a poll released this week is any indication of how the August 5 primary election will turn out, current Wayne County Executive Bob Ficano has reason to worry, Fox 2 reports. Ficano, who’s seeking a third term, polled in fourth place — behind former Detroit Police Chief Warren Evans, Westland Mayor Bill Wild and Wayne County Commissioner Phil Cavanaugh, according to Fox 2. The poll by Strategic Solutions LLC, showed 6.7 percent of respondents said they’d vote for Ficano, which isn’t so bad: He finished ahead of County Commissioner Kevin McNamara (who came in at No. 6) and someone literally described as “a candidate not named here” (who polled at No. 5.) If you’re planning to head to the polls — which you should! — and need some input on the candidates and ballot proposals, you can read for our election coverage in this week’s Metro Times.

    The post Poll shows Bob Ficano behind in Wayne County Executive race appeared first on Metro Times Blogs.

  • A Mad Decent Mixtape

    Mad Decent Block Party will roll through town on Saturday, August 16, bringing to town artists like Dillon Francis, Diplo, Flosstradamus, RiFF RAFF, Keys N Krates, and Zeds Dead. Thugli, a Canadian duo, will perform on the Toronto leg of the tour and they put together a 45 minute mix that features songs by some of the tour’s featured artists as well as a host of others.  Listen to it here. 

    The post A Mad Decent Mixtape appeared first on Metro Times Blogs.

  • Tangent Gallery to host Breaking Borders

    Detroit’s Tangent Gallery will host a special event this Saturday, July 26 in hopes of raising money for the local faction of an international nonprofit, Burners without Borders Detroit. Breaking Borders is a one-evening-only event that will feature live music, performance, and art. Satori Circus will perform along with spoken word artist ZakAndWhatArmy. Music by Tartanic, Dixon’s Violin, and Servitor. Fire dancers, hoop performers, and acrobats will provide a certain mysticism to the ambiance as old Victorian steampunk and tribal art is shown in the main gallery. There will also be a runway fashion show and the evening will end with a dubstep rave featuring DJ Forcefeed and Dotty. Truly, there’s something for everyone. Perhaps more importantly, there will be a full service bar. The event is open to those 18 and older and IDs will be checked at the door. Admission is $25 at the door, or $20 with the donation of a canned good. Doors open at 7 p.m. and the party goes until 2 a.m. A 20 percent commission will be taken from all art sold at this event and donated to Burners without Borders. The Tangent Gallery is located at 715 Milwaukee Ave., Detroit; 313-873-2955; tangentgallery.com.

    The post Tangent Gallery to host Breaking Borders appeared first on Metro Times Blogs.

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Review: Luv

Hate the game. Coming-of-age drama aims high but doesn’t make it

Photo: N/A, License: N/A

Michael Rainey Jr. and Common enliven this low-budget crime drama.


Luv C+

Heartfelt banality. Though co-writer and director Sheldon Candis and co-writer Justin Wilson’s Luv follows a narrative path well-worn by all the Hollywood ex-cons who have planned to go straight only to get sucked back into their bad ’ol ways, this low-budget crime drama scores a few points for its craft and the sincerity of its performances.

Woody (Michael Rainey Jr.) is a watchful 11-year-old kid who lives with his grandmother (Lonette McKee) and recently released ex-con Uncle Vincent (Common) while mom gets clean in a drug treatment center. Though he’s supposed to dropped off at school by his uncle, Woody instead spends the day with Vincent, learning “what it takes to be a man across the board.” This includes getting a flashy suit, learning to drive, and accompanying him on rounds as he tries to drum up the money for his dream restaurant. Unfortunately, Vincent’s meetings with his criminal mentors Mr. Fish (Dennis Haysbert, playing against type) and brother Arthur (Dennis Glover) don’t yield the loan he desperately needs. They do, however, send him on an errand that drops him right back into the violent world he left behind.

“America is not a country, it’s a corporation,” teaches Vincent. And as nephew and uncle get caught up in ever-more-dangerous scenarios —culminating in a drug deal where Woody has to broker the exchange —we wonder whether the boy will survive, if not in body then in soul, the tough alpha-male love his uncle is offering.

Common and Rainey make for a good team. Though Vincent is portrayed as a particularly flawed man, all too willing to put his nephew in harm’s way and often reacting with impulsive brutality, Common portrays him with earnest complexity, making clear that he’s seeking redemption in the only way he knows how. Rainey Jr. is similarly fine as the boy who has to grow up much too quickly. Still one wonders if his story might have played better with a slightly older child.

Candis demonstrates a practiced hand in his direction, effectively framing many shots from Woody’s perspective, keeping the pace brisk and, in the scenes that count, the tension taut. But there’s no getting around Luv’s meandering and highly formulaic script. Baltimore’s gritty underbelly has been depicted with more originality and authenticity in such television shows as Homicide and The Wire, and, given the film’s subject matter, you can’t help but make the comparison. Worse, the dramatic wheels come completely off as the movie stumbles into its take-the-money-and-run final act.

With its top-notch all-black cast, Luv makes clear that there simply aren’t enough dramas making use of actors like Haysbert, Glover and Charles Dutton, nor enough genre pictures incorporating the black experience into their narratives. If only Candis and Wilson could pen (or find) a script that matched their much-needed ambitions.