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  • 48 to film — behind the scenes at the 48 Hour Film Project

    By Amanda Mooney There’s a lot that goes into producing a film, and unless you are a filmmaker you really have no idea. Writing, casting, finding a location, shooting, and editing; each step of the process can take days, months, and sometimes years to complete. Can you imagine doing it ALL in just 48 hours? The 48 Hour Film Project is an annual competition that takes place all over the world in various cities. According to Mike Madigan, head of the Detroit 48 Hour chapter, the city is one of the largest participating in terms of the number of teams. The competing teams go in blind as to what kind of film they will be producing, with no creative planning beyond getting a cast and crew together, Madigan explained. “They pick a genre out of a hat, and they get a line, a prop, and a character. And they have to incorporate that within a short film, that’s usually between 4 to 7 minutes long. And they have the timeframe of doing it all within 48 hours,” said Madigan, “So all the creative process of it all has to happen within that 48 hour–writing a script, putting it together, editing–to […]

    The post 48 to film — behind the scenes at the 48 Hour Film Project appeared first on Metro Times Blogs.

  • Passalacqua debut dark project ‘Church: Revival’ at new Hamtramck performance space

    Church: Revival is the new project by local rap duo Passalacqua (aka Bryan Lackner and Brent Smith), but it’s more than just a new Passalacqua release. The rappers teamed up with siblings Jax Anderson (frontwoman of rockers Flint Eastwood) and Seth Anderson, who together form the songwriting team called Syblyng (naturally). The result is a cycle of songs that promises to be darker than Passalacqua’s material so far. The project will make a live debut on Saturday, July 26 at a brand new venue space at the Detroit Bus Co.’s building Eight & Sand, and they will premiere the Right Bros.-directed video for the track “Baptism” as well. Other performances include Tunde Olaniran and Open Mike Eagle, and DJ sets by Nothing Elegant, Dante LaSalle, and Charles Trees. We met up the two duos at Eight & Sand to check out the new space and to talk about the project with all parties involved. Metro Times: How long have you been working together? Jax Anderson: Seth and I are constantly writing songs together. We want to push in the direction of becoming songwriters more frequently. This is our first project that we took on to co-write everything together. We’re basically just a songwriting entity. We won’t play live that […]

    The post Passalacqua debut dark project ‘Church: Revival’ at new Hamtramck performance space appeared first on Metro Times Blogs.

  • PETA offers to pay overdue water bills for Detroiters willing to go vegan

    #150207742 / gettyimages.com As locals continue to flood Detroit streets to protest the city’s ongoing water debacle, one national organization is hoping to be part of the solution — that is, for a dietary price. People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, or PETA as the organization is more commonly known, has offered to pay outstanding water bills for 10 Detroiters who are willing to go vegan for one month. “Vegan meals take far less of a toll on the Earth’s resources,” PETA representatives said in a recent press release. “It takes about 2,500 gallons of water to produce just a pound of meat but only about 155 gallons of water to produce a pound of wheat.” PETA President Ingrid E. Newkirk adds, “Vegan meals are also a cost-effective way to help prevent health problems such as diabetes, high blood pressure, and heart conditions, the last thing that someone who is struggling financially needs to deal with.” Folks interested in participating are asked to send a copy of their most recent overdue water bill and their written pledge to go vegan for one month to PETA Attn: Detroit Water at 501 Front St., Norfolk, VA 23510 before Aug. 1.

    The post PETA offers to pay overdue water bills for Detroiters willing to go vegan appeared first on Metro Times Blogs.

  • Dinner Club Does Brunch

    Sure, The Dinner Club, a regularly occurring pop-up that takes places at the Storefront Gallery  in Ferndale (and other locations, occasionally), usually happens around dinner time, but this Sunday, July 27, there will be a special edition: Brunch Chef Matthew Baldridge, who’s resume includes stints at such Detroit greats as Cliff Bell’s, The Rattlesnake Club, and Seldom Blues, has crafted a menu of French-inspired items that employ locally procured ingredients. Brunch includes four courses where guests will be treated to such delights as cocoa, cinnamon, chili-spiced creamy grits with pickled strawberries, cocoa puffs and strawberry-infused syrup, a smoked gouda potato gallette with Faygo Root Beer braised pork belly, quail egg and Faygo Root Beer syrup, banana marscapone-filled French toast with fresh raspberries, whipped cream and balsamic syrup, and champagne-soaked strawberries. It is also important to note that brunch is BYOChampagne. Baldridge, along with The Storefront Gallery’s Derek John and Lilacpop Studio owner and artist Janna Coumoundouros, curate the event that includes an art show, a great playlist, and visuals. Brunch services are at 10:30 a.m. and 1 p.m. and last about two hours, only 20 seats are available at each service. The cost is $25 plus a service fee. The Storefront Gallery […]

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  • Jurassic 5 holds onto what’s golden

      By Ashley Zlatopolsky It’s been a little over twenty years since iconic ‘90s alternative hip-hop group Jurassic 5 first formed in Los Angeles’ Good Life club. Widely regarded as a pivotal influence in the decade’s underground hip-hop movement by critics and fans alike, the six-piece crew consisting of two DJs (Cut Chemist and DJ Nu-Mark) and four MCs (Akil, Zaakir, Marc 7 and Chali 2na) were well on their way to becoming one of hip-hop’s greatest and most powerful acts of all time, ranking alongside names such as Public Enemy and N.W.A. with socially-conscious lyrics and smooth beats paired with smart sampling. But in 2004, Cut Chemist left the group to pursue a solo career, and in 2007 Jurassic 5 completely called it quits after nearly 15 years of music. And that was it for the crew until 2013. After almost seven years apart (nine for Cut Chemist), Jurassic 5 reunited and re-emerged stronger than ever before with a new flair, seasoned attitude, and more vibrant energy at Coachella Music Festival, the group’s first show with the original six members since Cut Chemist split. During their performance, Jurassic 5 gave fans a memorable concert revisiting all the classic feel-good tracks […]

    The post Jurassic 5 holds onto what’s golden appeared first on Metro Times Blogs.

  • Detroit Riverwalk west extension opens from Riverfront Towers to Rosa Parks

    Dogs of Detroit have new territory to trot: Yesterday, the Detroit Riverfront Conservancy held a soft opening for a 20-acre westward extension of the Riverwalk. Part of a planned two-mile track of the West Riverwalk, the new span runs from the Riverfront Towers to Rosa Parks Boulevard, says Mark Pasco, director of communications for the conservancy. “It’s going to be great,” Pasco says. “It’s a wide open green space. It’s going to be great for activities.” The endgame for the Riverwalk, Pasco notes, is to extend the walkway from the Ambassador Bridge to Gabriel Richard Park, just past the MacArthur Bridge — about a 5.5. mile route. The new westward expansion is wider than most of the walkway, about 30 feet, says Pasco — a decision made by the conservancy to accommodate fisherman that previously frequented the area. “We knew … once it opened up they’d want to fish there again, so we made the Riverwalk itself wider,” Pasco says. The conservancy will hold a grand opening in late September, which will include “food and music and activities,” Pasco says, though no official date has been set.

    The post Detroit Riverwalk west extension opens from Riverfront Towers to Rosa Parks appeared first on Metro Times Blogs.

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Culture Feature

The Detroit Fashion Scene

Two Detroit women leave their creative mark on the city’s fashion landscape.

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Julie Lindsay’s Rolston bag.

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Dress designed by Cynthia LaMaide.

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Cynthia LaMaide

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Julie Lindsay



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Cynthia LaMaide and Julie Lindsay have taken two very different journeys as designers. LaMaide creates one-of-a-kind, handmade dresses, the latest stop on a creative path that included 20 years as a stylist in Miami and touring with Lenny Kravitz. And one of Lindsay’s bags had a supporting role as Kristin Chenoweth’s power purse in Family Weekend. Both designers say that their love of sewing and crafting by hand is the legacy of their grandmothers.

Cynthia LaMaide

Cynthia LaMaide still vibes like the Wisconsin kid that didn’t (for real) see a copy of Vogue magazine until she was in college. She grew up sewing with her grandmother in a rural area outside Green Bay. The moment her fire lit was the day she went to someone’s house and watched her grandmother construct an entire dress right there, on the spot.

“That’s what I want to do,” she says about the watershed moment.

She put her mad sewing skills to work and did just that, sewing a dress each day, all through high school — dresses for herself, her friends and family; including her grandmother. Next stop was Arizona State for clothing design, marriage, a daughter, a divorce and a long stint in Miami.

She was doing mostly custom work in 1985 when her boyfriend, a photographer, asked her to do some styling.

At that time, Miami was the hot place for magazine and catalogue shoots, and music videos.

“Everybody came,” said LaMaide. “You made a fortune.” It turned into a great way to support herself and her daughter for the next 20 years. Because of her intense self-training, she could sew, fix and pin quickly on models at a shoot, and she became known for her ability as well as her mild and meticulous Midwest work ethic.

The shoots were also a great place for her to market her own designs and she had Miami factories making the styles ordered by buyers.

After moving to Michigan with husband Bill Mallin, LaMaide wanted to pursue more artistic endeavors.

“I think people are kind of tired of that mass produced stuff,” she says.

LaMaide says she wants people to feel good in her designs and that handmade clothes give off a feel-good vibration. “I try to put that vibration into my work.”

LaMaide has been doing the art show circuit with her handmade creations, “the good ones,” she said, meaning the really good ones, such as the Smithsonian Craft Fair, The American Craft Council’s Palm Beach show and One of a Kind in Chicago.

Once you’ve designed for motion pictures, toured with Lenny Kravitz and dressed Jennifer Aniston (in Wanderlust), it seems like you might get jaded, but LaMaide, despite being an absolute master at her art, is like a kid with her first bike — showing off the bag she got from participating in last summer’s extremely prestigious Prête-à-Porter in Paris.

In a studio that would make Project Runway contestants salivate, LaMaide experiments with fabrics, processes and fabric treatments, hand painting silk, felting fabrics together, and marbling fabrics, by setting paint on top of liquid cellulose in a repurposed photographic tray.

“I kind of love the techniques.” The next technique she’s working into her pieces is weaving. “Oh that’s really fun,” said LaMaide, who still tries to make a dress every day.

Click here for more information on Cynthia LaMaide.

Julie Lindsay

Julie Lindsay’s grandmother designed custom menswear for the who’s who of Detroit elite as well as doing alterations for the venerated but now-defunct J.L. Hudson’s department store, downtown. Lindsay’s mother used to have the sharpest clothes in school; and Lindsay started young following in her grandmother’s footsteps.

“My whole life growing up, I always would sew,” she says. “In high school, I made my prom dress.”

In 2003, Lindsay started making fabric handbags to give as gifts and sell at art shows.

She always put a business card in every bag and one day she was thrilled to get a call from InStyle magazine, wanting to feature her leopard print and suede “cat tote” in a “What’s Hot Now” feature.

“I knew I needed to get a manufacturer, that there was no possible way for me to keep up,” recalls Lindsay.

She found a military manufacturer in Traverse City to do the work and immediately sold out the first run of 175 bags. The orders came in so fast that they crashed her website.

“It was exciting,” she remembers. “That was the press that really moved things forward.”

At her first trade show in California, in 2005, she had a line wrapped that snaked around her booth waiting to place orders. Her sister and her best friend both flew in from Florida and Washington state, respectively, to help.

“That California gift show, I have to say was awesome,” she says.

Lindsay says she’s driven by hard-hitting inspirations, which she finds in colors, in a pair of shoes, in the skins she works with. “Colors and different leathers inspire me,” she says. “Or, just a plain big piece of leather.”

Lindsay’s husband Scott, a former machinist, machined her signature nameplate on his lunch hour. “People like that chunky, square, heavy,” she says of her hardware, which is now manufactured in Italy.

Lindsay was drawn to creating bags because she likes to carry a bag that makes a statement. The Julie Lindsay girl, she says, “likes to carry a really sharp functional bag that people notice. Yeah, she likes to be noticed. If they’re trying to remain anonymous, they’re not going to carry one.”

Lindsay carries a black version of the fringed Rolston hobo — pictured above.

“It’s such a personal piece. It says a lot,” she explains. “I’ve just always liked to carry something that was really hip and cool. I’m not a very fancy girl — my wedding ring cost like $10. Everybody has [his or her] thing. For me, it’s handbags.”

Lindsay’s next challenge: Shoes. She has created one pair that recently appeared in StyleLine magazine.

“One day I’d like to get into shoes and handbags and do those two things together. That would be my ultimate dream,” she says. “I’ve still got goals. I’m certainly not finished at all.” Upcoming stops on Lindsay’s journey include a Nov. 21 trunk show at Pilling Gallery in Detroit, a sale date on NBC’s Today show and a Kickstarter campaign to raise money, which will allow her to expand her line by six new purses.

“The whole thing is a journey,” she offers, adding, “if you’re doing something you love, then it’s a good journey.”

Click here for more information on Julie Lindsay.

Beth Robinson is a contributor to the Metro Times. Send comments to letters@metrotimes.com.

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