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    The post Poll show Bob Ficano behind in Wayne County Executive race appeared first on Metro Times Blogs.

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    The post A Mad Decent Mixtape appeared first on Metro Times Blogs.

  • Tangent Gallery to host Breaking Borders

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    The post Tangent Gallery to host Breaking Borders appeared first on Metro Times Blogs.

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    The post 48 to film — behind the scenes at the 48 Hour Film Project appeared first on Metro Times Blogs.

  • Passalacqua debut dark project ‘Church: Revival’ at new Hamtramck performance space

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    The post Passalacqua debut dark project ‘Church: Revival’ at new Hamtramck performance space appeared first on Metro Times Blogs.

  • PETA offers to pay overdue water bills for Detroiters willing to go vegan

    #150207742 / gettyimages.com As locals continue to flood Detroit streets to protest the city’s ongoing water debacle, one national organization is hoping to be part of the solution — that is, for a dietary price. People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, or PETA as the organization is more commonly known, has offered to pay outstanding water bills for 10 Detroiters who are willing to go vegan for one month. “Vegan meals take far less of a toll on the Earth’s resources,” PETA representatives said in a recent press release. “It takes about 2,500 gallons of water to produce just a pound of meat but only about 155 gallons of water to produce a pound of wheat.” PETA President Ingrid E. Newkirk adds, “Vegan meals are also a cost-effective way to help prevent health problems such as diabetes, high blood pressure, and heart conditions, the last thing that someone who is struggling financially needs to deal with.” Folks interested in participating are asked to send a copy of their most recent overdue water bill and their written pledge to go vegan for one month to PETA Attn: Detroit Water at 501 Front St., Norfolk, VA 23510 before Aug. 1.

    The post PETA offers to pay overdue water bills for Detroiters willing to go vegan appeared first on Metro Times Blogs.

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Culture

Campbell’s kids

What’s that ineffable quality that makes Bruce Campbell so … groovy?

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I was in the Army from ’89 to ’91. I was stationed in Germany, and we didn’t really have a lot of options for TV or movies at our barracks. We had Star Wars, Top Gun and the two Evil Dead movies. We watched Ash beat up demons more than we watched Goose bang his head on the canopy. Bruce Campbell was our hero. Especially to the Michiganders in our barracks. I associate his movies with good times had by all who watched Evil Dead one and two in the dayroom. He entertained us. Jim Gamboe

 

I love Bruce enough to have chosen my Suicide Girls name based on that. He was just an average Joe, born and raised in the metro Detroit area, passionate about creativity and making movies, a genius of his times and a classic Super 8 B-movie maker. My fondest memories are watching this b class horror flicks; and feeling that sense of comfort when watching them. His dry sense of humor and one-liners are one thing that makes me appreciate him the most; and I find myself quoting frequently. —Jessica Dawl

 

I certainly do feel as if he were a distant relative of mine. Being from the area makes him a bit more of a relatable human to me. —Eric Busch

 

In Bruce’s acting, what I enjoy is that he has a sort of comic wink that breaks the fourth wall and lets the audience in on his private joke. It’s not something that you find distracting, or something that takes you out of the movie. It’s something that lets you instantly relate to him. Also, in Evil Dead 2, the scene where he completely breaks down really impressed itself on me. In the scene, all the inanimate objects in the room start laughing and instead of letting the laughter push him down, he laughs along. It’s possible that as Detroiters we can more easily relate to going through the depths of hell and coming out the other side laughing, even if it is psychotic laughter. —Michael McGettigan

 

He’s like this Everyman, but he’s cool and weirdly heroic at the same time. He’s like a hero you could have hung out with in high school. His whole career is all this off-the-wall stuff, but he’s so distinctive, he’s the best thing about every film he’s ever done.

He could be that cool older guy who lived on your block and started all the interesting trouble you got into. —Mary Fortuna

 

I love his unapologetic manliness; he exudes it. Couple that with a brash tongue-in-cheek sense of humor and you have a winning combination in my book. —Kim Mitchell

 

Bruce Campbell is the Clark Gable of jocular reanimation cinema. —George Barry, director of Death Bed: The Bed That Eats and fellow Royal Oaker

 

It’s difficult to narrow down the qualities that make me love Bruce Campbell. Is it his wry grin? His heroic chin? His comic timing? I suppose if I had to pick just one thing it would be his self-effacing humor. There aren’t many actors who introduce themselves as “The Idiot, Bruce Campbell.” He may put on a comic act of being a movie star but he’s really just a regular guy. He was at the Toronto Film Festival a few years ago, supporting My Name is Bruce. After the screening he stuck around to sign interviews and have pictures taken with him. It got so late that the theater asked everyone to leave. Instead of taking this opportunity to head back to his hotel room, Bruce stayed out on the street in front of the theater for another two hours until every fan went away happy. He understands where his popularity comes from and appreciates it. —Mike White, co-host of The Projection Booth podcast

 

The appeal of Bruce Campbell is simple. He tells the truth. And he does it with a smirk and a dash of overconfidence. A lovable jerk we love to root for no matter the foe, zombies, witches, li’l Ashes, Peter Parker or his own possessed demon hand. Of all the characters Bruce Campbell has played in his career — Ash, the charming Autolycus, the swashbuckling Jack Stiles, the smartass Sam Axe, that snooty usher in Spider-Man 2 or just a plain ol’ shemp — my favorite is always … Bruce Campbell. —Chris Gore, former editor of Film Threatmagazine

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